How to Rebuild Software RAID 10 in Mountain Lion – Command Line

Posted: February 27th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, RAID | No Comments »

Removal

First, replace the disk 😉

Open a terminal session on affected system and run
diskutil appleRAID list
find the UUID for the affected drive and the UUID for theRAID set. Then fill in the blanks below:
sudo diskutil appleRAID remove <drive UUID> <RAID UUID>
For example:
sudo diskutil appleRAID remove EEDD0AD6-C448-48F7-A766-001C65338E99 7010C337-829C-4F08-B6A4-1C8A9E943CBD
Our RAID 10 now only has three disks attached.

Rebuild

First we need to identify the spare disk waiting for us in the system. Use diskutil list to do this. Here’s some example output. See if you can spot the disk that is not like the others.

# diskutil list

/dev/disk0
   #:                       TYPE NAME                    SIZE       IDENTIFIER
   0:      GUID_partition_scheme                        *119.9 GB   disk0
   1:                        EFI                         209.7 MB   disk0s1
   2:                  Apple_HFS ServerHD                118.9 GB   disk0s2
   3:                 Apple_Boot Recovery HD             784.2 MB   disk0s3
/dev/disk1
   #:                       TYPE NAME                    SIZE       IDENTIFIER
   0:      GUID_partition_scheme                        *2.0 TB     disk1
   1:                        EFI                         209.7 MB   disk1s1
   2:                 Apple_RAID                         2.0 TB     disk1s2
   3:                 Apple_Boot Boot OS X               134.2 MB   disk1s3
/dev/disk2
   #:                       TYPE NAME                    SIZE       IDENTIFIER
   0:      GUID_partition_scheme                        *2.0 TB     disk2
   1:                        EFI                         209.7 MB   disk2s1
   2:                 Apple_RAID                         2.0 TB     disk2s2
   3:                 Apple_Boot Boot OS X               134.2 MB   disk2s3
/dev/disk3
   #:                       TYPE NAME                    SIZE       IDENTIFIER
   0:      GUID_partition_scheme                        *2.0 TB     disk3
   1:                        EFI                         209.7 MB   disk3s1
   2:                 Apple_RAID                         2.0 TB     disk3s2
   3:                 Apple_Boot Boot OS X               134.2 MB   disk3s3
/dev/disk4
   #:                       TYPE NAME                    SIZE       IDENTIFIER
   0:                                                   *2.0 TB     disk4
/dev/disk5
   #:                       TYPE NAME                    SIZE       IDENTIFIER
   0:                  Apple_HFS Storage                *4.0 TB     disk5
thuja:~ pwladmin$

 

We can see in this list that disk4 has no partition maps and thus is the new disk. We can now add this disk into our degraded raid with:
sudo diskutil appleRAID add member <NewMemberDeviceName> <RAID UUID>
for example
sudo diskutil appleRAID add member disk4 7010C337-829C-4F08-B6A4-1C8A9E943CBD
Your disk is now part of the raid set. If you use diskutil appleRAID list you’ll be able to check the progress of the rebuild.

===============================================================================
Name: Thuja RAID A
Unique ID: 920F03EB-DE44-49AA-9934-0EF53EF032D1
Type: Mirror
Status: Online
Size: 2.0 TB (2000054910976 Bytes)
Rebuild: manual
Device Node: -
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
# DevNode UUID Status Size
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
0 disk1s2 D4BCB349-3255-473B-B586-EAF066C5BD6D Online 2000054910976
1 disk3s2 E01DB36B-CDC4-458C-AC07-507433DCB481 Online 2000054910976
===============================================================================
===============================================================================
Name: Thuja Stripe RAID
Unique ID: 9D9FEE5F-5F04-4051-A0AB-A985DFFAF2A0
Type: Stripe
Status: Online
Size: 4.0 TB (4000109559808 Bytes)
Rebuild: manual
Device Node: disk5
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
# DevNode UUID Status Size
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
0 -none- 920F03EB-DE44-49AA-9934-0EF53EF032D1 Online 2000054779904
1 -none- 7010C337-829C-4F08-B6A4-1C8A9E943CBD Online 2000054779904
===============================================================================
===============================================================================
Name: Thuja RAID B
Unique ID: 7010C337-829C-4F08-B6A4-1C8A9E943CBD
Type: Mirror
Status: Degraded
Size: 2.0 TB (2000054910976 Bytes)
Rebuild: manual
Device Node: -
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
# DevNode UUID Status Size
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
0 disk2s2 13AFF0CD-77FB-4E14-9A89-A09C01ACA4C4 Online 2000054910976
1 disk4s2 EAE79161-3729-41FB-81A1-97CE878C1E31 1% (Rebuilding)2000054910976
===============================================================================

 


CrashPlan Proe 3.8.2010.2 on Mountain Lion 10.8.5

Posted: February 22nd, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: CrashPlan, Mac OS X | 1 Comment »

I recently had an issue where I could not load the CrashPlan proe server onto a 10.8.5 Mac Mini. The app installed however when I asked for the management interface on port 4280 I was greeted with a URL redirect and a blank white page. I was also getting this from /Library/Logs/PROserver/proserver.startup.err


[02.22.14 11:45:02.159 INFO main temPropertiesLoader.loadSystemProperties] * loading properties from: conf/proserver.properties
com.code42.exception.DebugRuntimeException: Failed to start CPCentralServices.
at com.backup42.app.cpc.CPCentralServices.init(CPCentralServices.java:297)
at com.backup42.controller.CPCentralController.start(CPCentralController.java:65)
at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:39)
at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:25)
at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:597)
at com.backup42.main.CPServiceManager.invokeAll(CPServiceManager.java:120)
at com.backup42.main.CPServiceManager.start(CPServiceManager.java:89)
at com.backup42.main.CPServer.start(CPServer.java:123)
at com.backup42.main.CPServer.main(CPServer.java:387)
Caused by: java.lang.NumberFormatException: For input string: ""
at java.lang.NumberFormatException.forInputString(NumberFormatException.java:48)
at java.lang.Long.parseLong(Long.java:431)
at java.lang.Long.valueOf(Long.java:525)
at com.backup42.server.manage.ServerManager.initializeMyGuid(ServerManager.java:64)
at com.backup42.server.manage.OsXServerManager.initializeGuid(OsXServerManager.java:170)
at com.backup42.server.manage.ServerManagerService.initializeGuid(ServerManagerService.java:568)
at com.backup42.app.cpc.CPCentralServices.init(CPCentralServices.java:159)

The solution was the following:

stop the service launchctl unload /Library/LaunchDaemons/com.crashplan.proserver.plist
edit launchd plist to point to /System/Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/1.6.0.jdk/Contents/Commands/java instead of /usr/bin/java
then rm /Library/CrashPlan/.proserver_identity
start the service and profit!


Abandoning the Mac

Posted: February 2nd, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Blog, Mac OS X | No Comments »

Unitron_Mac512_System_s1I still remember the day I bought my first Mac, it was the Macintosh IIFX. It had an 68030 processor with 24MB of memory and 100MB SCSI hard drive. If you know anything about 68k machines, you should this the Spruce Goose of hardware. The machine originally had a price tag of $11,000 but I got mine for $30. P.C. Place in Surrey BC was having a sidewalk sale in the late 90’s and they were stacked on a skid about 6 units high. As urgently as a girl getting her first period, I rushed home completely beside myself with anticipation. Mac, check… ADB keyboard, check…. ADB mouse, check… Mac compatible monitor adapter, uh… uhhhh… what the heck is this video port? This isn’t VGA.

One angry bike ride later I had my Mac compatible VGA adapter, you remember them: the one with the dip switches and the two parrots on it. I plugged it in, turned it on, and was greeted by what I now call the Sound of Failure. After about a day on this machine, I got TCP/IP up and running on a hacked version of System 7.5.5 that I got off a buddy’s Hotline server. Yeah, that’s right, Hotline. Deal with it. The only other computer I had was a Windows 95 box that I used to download Apple floppy images. Hey, who remembers booting off floppy? Oh hey Andrew!

Those were the glory days, when getting a Mac was a special privilege. Ownership instantly baptized you into this world of insanity where people congregated just to boast about the superiority of their chosen platform. It meant you were a bit of a hacker, trying to squeeze as much as you could out of an old machine, mostly due to the superior case design, upgradability, and stability of OS 7-9. RIP. G3 upgrade for my 6400/180 603e? Yes please!

Today things are different. Apple has abandoned their professional customers, reduced the value of their product to commodity status, and all but destroyed the sub-culture that existed. Most MUGs are dead, with members taking to a recollection of better days more often than they experience new ones. Those die hard faithfuls struggled for Apple when they were dying, we celebrated them when they arose from the ashes, we promoted them and helped achieve relevant market footprint by proselytizing their almost evangelical status. However, in the end Apple abandoned us, they give us shittier tools with every revision, mediocre hardware often built on last years advances, and $29.99 server software that is promoted by a K-Mart style blue light.

The revolution is over. Communism won, and we cheered for it.